A poet from down under…

Here we are in the first week of the new semester, which means I’m back on Sundays. Which also means it’s slow as heck today and I’ve already finished prepping for my two classes I have next week for instruction. The one I was just working on is a Business Comm class where I was pre-researching Disneyland (Tokyo and Paris), McDonald’s in China, and Starbucks use of social media. After all of that I have a sudden strong urge to eat awful cheeseburgers, drink a vast amount of liquid sugar in the form of a Frappuccino, and haul tail over to the Magic Kingdom for a spin on Pirates. Of course I won’t be doing any of those things, but I am certainly NOT impervious to advertising and have been known to do things rather impulsively and regret them later so I had to stop.

So now, with my last hour here on my first Sunday back, I will resume the Sunday roulette. Today I decided to get crazy (watch out) and use the reference stacks, which I have never done before. After getting my random numbers I actually found myself in a section that I think I can work with. Today I Pulled Modern Women Writers: Volume 2 Falcon to Lynch from the library of literacy criticism. It’s big and boring looking since it’s a reference book, but here’s the spine for proof of my pick.

IMG_2084 - Copy

The volume is, essentially, a list of modern women writers which has a short page or so entry for each person. The entries start with a general introduction of the writer, followed by a short description and criticism of some of their popular works. Today I opened up to an Australian poet named Gwen Harwood. Here’s her intro:

Those who study Australian poetry don’t agree on much, but they would all agree that Gwen Harwood is exceptionally adept at masking. Even those who have only read one or two of her poems know, of course, that she has written acrostics adroit enough not be recognized as such by the fragile skills of editors. A little more acquaintance teaches us that she has written under pen names such as “Miriam Stone” and “Francis Geyer,” poems that have excited many a talent spotter with the convictions that they have just discovered a coruscating new Austpoet (Robinson, 1996, pg. 277).

A couple things here. First, I feel like I am not familiar with any kind of Australian poets so this is exciting to be introduced to. Second, I don’t know some of these words so… acrostics= a poem or word puzzle / adroit= clever or skillful/ coruscating= flashing, sparkling or brilliant. There, now I know about a new market of poets I’ve never read, as well as some new vocab words. I like the fact that she uses pen names, and changes it up. Let me see if I can find some of her work to share.

Three of the poems mentioned in her bio are “The New Music”, “To A.D. Hope”, and something called an Eisenbart and Krote group, which I’m not quite totally sure of. We don’t have any of her books here at the U, but she is mentioned as a chapter in a larger book Nine Lives- “ch. Six Gwen Harwood takes on the poetry pundit”. I couldn’t find the poems they mentioned in Modern Women Writers but there are a couple found here at a site called poemhunter. “In the park” is written about often as one of her more well known poems, demonstrating Harwood’s interpretation of the struggle imposed upon some women in motherhood.

Well that’s it for today, I went ahead an ordered a copy of her collected works to catch up on this week. If you are into poetry, check Gwen Harwood (or Miriam Stone, or Francis Geyer) out at your local book depository. I performed a meme check and just so you know, there are memes out there about Gwen Harwood, probably made by somebody who wasn’t so excited about reading her in class.

GH

Robinson, L. S. (1996). Modern Women Writers: Falcón to Lynch (Vol. 2). New York: Continuum.

Sheridan, S. (2011). Nine lives: postwar women writers making their mark. Retrieved from http://0-ebookcentral.proquest.com.leopac.ulv.edu

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